Relman-Weil Debate: Three Views (3 of 3)

I agree with Dr. Weil.1 In spite of the efficacy of purified medicinals, a new industry has taken root. It is direct use of natural products. Native American Indians did not understand their use of herbs and roots, but they did know what was helpful. That folklore is available today in health food stores. The Old Lady of Shropshire was not a scientist, but she surely was an astute observer of the effects of digitalis plants. Doctors today should find something useful here, even if the supportin

Ss Fishman
Jul 4, 1999

I agree with Dr. Weil.1 In spite of the efficacy of purified medicinals, a new industry has taken root. It is direct use of natural products. Native American Indians did not understand their use of herbs and roots, but they did know what was helpful. That folklore is available today in health food stores. The Old Lady of Shropshire was not a scientist, but she surely was an astute observer of the effects of digitalis plants. Doctors today should find something useful here, even if the supporting data is epidemiological.

I agree with Dr. Relman. Taking a concoction of natural impurities into your stomach has got to be inefficient in terms of efficacy of an active ingredient. There may be a stomach condition preexisting, and you would prefer not to add more irritants and bulk. The basis of modern medicine is purified active agents and a measured dose. Just...

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