Science And Religion; `One-Party Science'

Science And Religion Discussions of religion and science miss the basic point that religion and theism, or belief in God, are not the same thing (B. Goodman, "Religious Scientists Sense The Divine In Their Work," The Scientist, Jan. 9, 1995, page 1). In fact, belief in God is not a central feature of all religions; one example is the more traditional forms of Buddhism. Trying to reintroduce God as a purpose in evolution is a new version of the "God of the gaps," as are many other attempts to s

Adrian Melott
Apr 2, 1995

Science And Religion

Discussions of religion and science miss the basic point that religion and theism, or belief in God, are not the same thing (B. Goodman, "Religious Scientists Sense The Divine In Their Work," The Scientist, Jan. 9, 1995, page 1). In fact, belief in God is not a central feature of all religions; one example is the more traditional forms of Buddhism.

Trying to reintroduce God as a purpose in evolution is a new version of the "God of the gaps," as are many other attempts to stitch things together. On the other hand, the simple recognition that we live in a universe that is constructed so as to allow consciousness and purpose to come into being allows for a religiousness that celebrates what we know from science and calls us to create that purpose.

At any rate, the discussion of the interaction of science and religion...

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