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Science Careers

Regarding the articles "Growth In Untenured Academic Science Jobs Seen Hurting Careers" [F. Hoke, page 1] and "Pressures Wearing Down Researchers" [M. Watanabe, page 1] in the Sept. 18, 1995, issue of The Scientist: Scientists who can continue on extended postdocs or similar positions are the lucky ones. One scientist with whom I did a postdoc was supporting himself, the last I heard, by part-time substitute teaching in local schools. Another, after five years as a postdoc and two as a faculty

James Golczewski
Regarding the articles "Growth In Untenured Academic Science Jobs Seen Hurting Careers" [F. Hoke, page 1] and "Pressures Wearing Down Researchers" [M. Watanabe, page 1] in the Sept. 18, 1995, issue of The Scientist: Scientists who can continue on extended postdocs or similar positions are the lucky ones.

One scientist with whom I did a postdoc was supporting himself, the last I heard, by part-time substitute teaching in local schools. Another, after five years as a postdoc and two as a faculty member, was out of work completely for more than four years. Of all the people I met in my own considerable time as a postdoc, I don't know of anyone who has found a permanent position.

The response to this situation should be obvious: All departments should immediately begin to reduce the number of graduate students by at least 25 percent. All efforts should be made to inform...

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