Sequence Your Own

As I read through the March 18 edition of The Scientist, I was saddened by the article on DNA sequencing.1 While many labs prefer the drop-off method of a core facility, some of us still love to perform manual sequencing. One does not have to wait for days as your samples get processed by others; rather you get your beautiful results the next day. Laborious is sitting next to a tissue culture hood for hours, not pouring a simple gel and actually running a few reactions. I find that for graduate

Michael Klemsz
Apr 28, 2002
As I read through the March 18 edition of The Scientist, I was saddened by the article on DNA sequencing.1 While many labs prefer the drop-off method of a core facility, some of us still love to perform manual sequencing. One does not have to wait for days as your samples get processed by others; rather you get your beautiful results the next day. Laborious is sitting next to a tissue culture hood for hours, not pouring a simple gel and actually running a few reactions. I find that for graduate students, learning to sequence is a valuable tool that helps them understand how to manipulate DNA as they develop their technical repertoire. Instead of buying kits or having someone else do your research, live a little. Run a sequencing gel and see the bases tomorrow. It will make you feel great!
Michael J. Klemsz, PhD
Associate Professor...

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