Stem Cells and Parkinson's

Your story "Stem Cell Researchers Take on Parkinson's" by Laura DeFrancesco1 suggests that opposition to continuing this research on human subjects is confined to politicians opposed to embryo research and people stirred up by the "press maelstrom" following a New York Times article. It is also opposed by many ethical scientists. What principal investigator Curt Freed is doing strikes me as manifestly unethical. He can no longer consider this human research in a state of equipoise--which justi

Lawrence Schneiderman
Jun 24, 2001
Your story "Stem Cell Researchers Take on Parkinson's" by Laura DeFrancesco1 suggests that opposition to continuing this research on human subjects is confined to politicians opposed to embryo research and people stirred up by the "press maelstrom" following a New York Times article. It is also opposed by many ethical scientists.

What principal investigator Curt Freed is doing strikes me as manifestly unethical. He can no longer consider this human research in a state of equipoise--which justified the risks in the original randomized controlled trial. For now the results are in. Compared to the present standard of care his intervention is more likely to harm than help. Yet, patients who are vulnerable and desperate are being exploited to undergo (and pay for) it.

I do not object to continuing research but I believe that researchers should put an end to this use of human subjects until more fundamental questions...

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