The Best And The Brightest

In the story on the Westinghouse Science Talent Search in the April 15, 1991, issue of The Scientist [page 20], National Science Teachers Association Executive Director William Aldridge addressed the issue of inequity in resources devoted by schools like Bronx High School of Science and Stuyvesant High School of New York City to competitions like the Westinghouse. According to Aldridge: "The individual kids who succeed in this program have undoubtedly worked very hard. But the thing that bother

Leon Seitelman
Sep 1, 1991

In the story on the Westinghouse Science Talent Search in the April 15, 1991, issue of The Scientist [page 20], National Science Teachers Association Executive Director William Aldridge addressed the issue of inequity in resources devoted by schools like Bronx High School of Science and Stuyvesant High School of New York City to competitions like the Westinghouse. According to Aldridge: "The individual kids who succeed in this program have undoubtedly worked very hard. But the thing that bothers me is that it's not truly a competition." The article characterized him as likening the Westinghouse to a race some competitors start far ahead of the others.

Science competence in the United States is at a near all-time low, public appreciation for the need to learn mathematics and science is still lacking, education budgets are under serious attack, and there is a critical need to attract the best and the brightest into...

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