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The Humane Community Does Do the Funding

As a scientist and an ex-psychologist, I am continually intrigued with the lengths to which psychologists will go to justify their shoddy little experiments at the expense of other animals, human and nonhuman alike. Susan Suarez certainly has my vote for "Rationalizer of the Year" with her letter "Humane Society Should Stop Criticizing, Start Funding," commenting on a letter by Lockwood and Stephens (The Scientist, December 15, 1986, p. 10 and February 9, 1987, p. 10). The humane community is, i

Donald Barnes
As a scientist and an ex-psychologist, I am continually intrigued with the lengths to which psychologists will go to justify their shoddy little experiments at the expense of other animals, human and nonhuman alike. Susan Suarez certainly has my vote for "Rationalizer of the Year" with her letter "Humane Society Should Stop Criticizing, Start Funding," commenting on a letter by Lockwood and Stephens (The Scientist, December 15, 1986, p. 10 and February 9, 1987, p. 10).

The humane community is, in fact, the principal force behind the all-too-few ongoing efforts to establish and validate non-animal methodologies for research and testing. Pressure from animal advocates on the Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrancy Association and its member organizations resulted in founding and maintaining the Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animals Testing (see The Scientist, December 15, 1986, p. 6). The American Fund for Alternatives to Animal Research...

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