Time, Space and St. Augustine

May I, from the other end of the ecclesiastical spectrum, welcome the letter from Andrew Szebenyi, S.J. (The Scientist, January 12, 1987, p. 10). As he says, "God does not create in time, but is the creator of time." He will know, what some of your readers may not know and some creationists may have forgotten, that this is explicitly proclaimed in the New Testament (Hebrews 1:1-2): "God … has spoken … by his Son by whom also he made the worlds" (Greek: Aiones, "indefinite time"). Wha

Robert Boyd
Mar 8, 1987
May I, from the other end of the ecclesiastical spectrum, welcome the letter from Andrew Szebenyi, S.J. (The Scientist, January 12, 1987, p. 10). As he says, "God does not create in time, but is the creator of time." He will know, what some of your readers may not know and some creationists may have forgotten, that this is explicitly proclaimed in the New Testament (Hebrews 1:1-2): "God … has spoken … by his Son by whom also he made the worlds" (Greek: Aiones, "indefinite time").

What your correspondent, in company with St. Augustine ("non in tempore sed cum tempore") and the writer to the Hebrews is saying about time is, of course, the orthodox Theist position. Since Einstein, physicists will be quick to realize that what is true ontologically of time must also be true of space even if, as seems likely, they once occupied a...