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Two-Career Couples

The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) applauds The Scientist for its article on dual-career couples: "Opportunities Expand for Two-Career Couples" (J. Kling, The Scientist, 12[12]:12, June 8, 1998). The rise of dual-career couples is an important and growing reality--one greatly deserving increased time and attention. Being part of a dual-career couple presents a variety of challenges to scientists, particularly women. Today, women who are preparing for science careers want both a prof

Catherine Didion

The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) applauds The Scientist for its article on dual-career couples: "Opportunities Expand for Two-Career Couples" (J. Kling, The Scientist, 12[12]:12, June 8, 1998). The rise of dual-career couples is an important and growing reality--one greatly deserving increased time and attention.

Being part of a dual-career couple presents a variety of challenges to scientists, particularly women. Today, women who are preparing for science careers want both a professional and personal life. In 1993, AWIS conducted a survey of women science students as part of the AWIS Mentoring Project. The survey results indicated 94 percent of the undergraduate women pursuing science careers envisioned themselves married or living with a partner. In addition, 77 percent wanted children (Mentoring Means Future Scientists, AWIS 1993). Men traditionally have been allowed to pursue both a career and a family and many of today's women scientists have the same expectation....

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