Two Views on Evolution

After reading Robert McCurdy's letter1 in The Scientist, and having already read Bruce Alberts' commentary,2 I perceive that there is a need to interject some rationalism into the hysteria created by the recent ruling concerning evolution. %09First of all, contrary to common perceptions, the ruling in no way removed the teaching of evolution from the science classroom in Kansas. Principles of evolution--such as genetic recombination and transposition; organismal adaptation, variation, and select

Martin Whiteside
Oct 24, 1999

After reading Robert McCurdy's letter1 in The Scientist, and having already read Bruce Alberts' commentary,2 I perceive that there is a need to interject some rationalism into the hysteria created by the recent ruling concerning evolution.

%09First of all, contrary to common perceptions, the ruling in no way removed the teaching of evolution from the science classroom in Kansas. Principles of evolution--such as genetic recombination and transposition; organismal adaptation, variation, and selection (such as antibiotic resistance in bacteria); gene mutation; and other microevolutionary concepts--are still taught in Kansas science classrooms. What they have simply done is take macroevolution--the concept that man evolved from a paramecium by the microevolutionary processes discussed above--off its lofty pedestal, and dubbed it a scientific hypothesis. This is quite commendable, and brings back some reason to the whole dogmatic field of evolutionary biology.

I am amazed at how scientists can demonstrate good critical...

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