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Unanswered Questions

(The Scientist, Vol:10, #6, p. 12, March 18, 1996) ------- We were pleased to see a discussion in The Scientist (B. Goodman, May 15, 1995, page 3) of the growing, worldwide concerns for the unanswered questions of special relativity. Inclusion with articles on "whistleblowing" was especially significant; though the physics dissidents have not (to our knowledge) questioned ethics, they suffer many of the same negative consequences. We were disheartened by the implications of inadequacies of que

Neil Munch

(The Scientist, Vol:10, #6, p. 12, March 18, 1996)

------- We were pleased to see a discussion in The Scientist (B. Goodman, May 15, 1995, page 3) of the growing, worldwide concerns for the unanswered questions of special relativity. Inclusion with articles on "whistleblowing" was especially significant; though the physics dissidents have not (to our knowledge) questioned ethics, they suffer many of the same negative consequences.

We were disheartened by the implications of inadequacies of questioners who also debate possible future solutions. In most science, we would hope that valid, unanswered questions lead to a search for truth, not impugning those who observe that "the emperor has no clothes."

Your article failed to note the slowly growing number of such conferences and journals around the world. Among unanswered questions, some are quite simple. For instance, conflicting results are produced by the Lorentz transformation-a basic set of equations of...

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