Understand the Difference Between Science, Religion

Craig K. Svensson completely misses the point concerning the teaching of creation science in the schools (The Scientist, January 26, 1987). I will defend the right of any individual to practice his own faith as long as such practice does not infringe upon or harm other members of society. Creation science is a religious belief and not a branch of scientific thought. Therefore, it is not appropriate to teach this subject in the context of science. I will not discuss the arguments concerning the l

Ronald Jensh
Mar 8, 1987
Craig K. Svensson completely misses the point concerning the teaching of creation science in the schools (The Scientist, January 26, 1987). I will defend the right of any individual to practice his own faith as long as such practice does not infringe upon or harm other members of society. Creation science is a religious belief and not a branch of scientific thought. Therefore, it is not appropriate to teach this subject in the context of science. I will not discuss the arguments concerning the literal interpretation of the Bible and the many pitfalls that entails.

However, I must address Svensson's statements concerning the teaching of this branch of faith in the science classroom.

First, since the scientific approach relies on testable hypotheses from which theories develop, and since creation science does not allow such inquiry, and rejects outright any evidence that does not fit the literal interpretation...