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'Untold Mischief'

Thank you for publishing the Opinion piece by Theodore Rockwell in your March 3, 1997 edition (page 9). Rockwell's elucidation of the (un)scientific basis for United States radiation protection regulations needs to be broadcast from the rooftops. It has caused untold mischief in the regulatory arena, while continuing to propagate the myth that we can have, and can afford, a "risk-free" society. The arguments that, as a society, we must err on the side of "conservative assumptions" have been ca

Leon Swenson

Thank you for publishing the Opinion piece by Theodore Rockwell in your March 3, 1997 edition (page 9). Rockwell's elucidation of the (un)scientific basis for United States radiation protection regulations needs to be broadcast from the rooftops. It has caused untold mischief in the regulatory arena, while continuing to propagate the myth that we can have, and can afford, a "risk-free" society.

The arguments that, as a society, we must err on the side of "conservative assumptions" have been carried to ridiculous extremes in the application of Linear No-Threshold to regulation of low-level radiation, as Rockwell has so effectively shown. And, as he so eloquently states, when carried to the extremes, "conservative assumptions" may no longer be the "safest" way to go. I fully support his call for revision of present regulations and policies on low-level radiation.

Leon D. Swenson
IHS Consultants
336 Snyder
Richland, Wash. 99352-1944
E-mail: lswenson@owt.com...

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