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What Scientists Need to Understand

The following comments are in response to the recent article titled, "Bush and Science at Loggerheads."1First, embryonic stem cell research is not a societal imperative, and has not been identified as a superior methodology of developing future medical benefits for mankind. The human embryo is like no other in the universe; it is uniquely qualified for the purpose of bringing more children into the world. It is never to be regarded as raw material for a genetic research factory.Second, scientifi

Vince Fantozzi

The following comments are in response to the recent article titled, "Bush and Science at Loggerheads."1

First, embryonic stem cell research is not a societal imperative, and has not been identified as a superior methodology of developing future medical benefits for mankind. The human embryo is like no other in the universe; it is uniquely qualified for the purpose of bringing more children into the world. It is never to be regarded as raw material for a genetic research factory.

Second, scientific uncertainties with respect to climate change are relevant. Anything resembling proper statistical weather records have only been captured during the past few hundred years. Since today's weather forecasters are not able to determine tomorrow's weather with the benefit of multi-doppler radar systems, it is laughable to believe that we truly understand the state of our planet and it's relative health. Observations are one thing, conclusions are clearly...

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