Where Credit Is Due

The Jan. 6, 1992, issue of The Scientist [page 21] included a report on the Bower Award, presented to Solomon H. Snyder. Without wishing to detract in any way from Snyder's richly deserved honor, I wish to point out that it was Hans Kosterlitz of the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and I who identified and named the enkephalins and, together with T.W. Smith, L. Fothergill, B. Morgan, and H.R. Morris, published the cited Nature paper (257:185-9, 1975), which characterized the two peptides. Sny

John Hughes
Feb 16, 1992
The Jan. 6, 1992, issue of The Scientist [page 21] included a report on the Bower Award, presented to Solomon H. Snyder. Without wishing to detract in any way from Snyder's richly deserved honor, I wish to point out that it was Hans Kosterlitz of the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and I who identified and named the enkephalins and, together with T.W. Smith, L. Fothergill, B. Morgan, and H.R. Morris, published the cited Nature paper (257:185-9, 1975), which characterized the two peptides. Snyder's Lasker award was for his research on the opiate receptor. Candace Pert and Snyder did not "find" the opiate receptor; it was already known. Lars Terenius of Uppsala University (Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica, 32:317-20, 1973), Eric Simon of New York University (E.J. Snyder, J.M. Hiller, I. Edelmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 70:1947-49, 1973), and Pert and Snyder refined the original methodology of Avaram Goldstein...

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