Xenotransplantation And Animal Rights

Franklin Hoke's interesting article about strides in technologies that may soon make xenotransplantation clinically viable ("Biotech Companies Set To Profit From Animal Organ Transplants," The Scientist, Oct. 16, 1995, page 1) was marred by the inclusion of the predictable complaints and criticisms of animal-rights groups. Spokespersons for these groups have nothing of value to say about science in any form, since they know little or nothing about it, or they conveniently subjugate their scien

Sharon Russell
Feb 4, 1996
Franklin Hoke's interesting article about strides in technologies that may soon make xenotransplantation clinically viable ("Biotech Companies Set To Profit From Animal Organ Transplants," The Scientist, Oct. 16, 1995, page 1) was marred by the inclusion of the predictable complaints and criticisms of animal-rights groups.

Spokespersons for these groups have nothing of value to say about science in any form, since they know little or nothing about it, or they conveniently subjugate their scientific knowledge to correspond with their fuzzy, sentimental pseudophilosophy demanding no animal use for any reason. This blanket statement includes those who really should know better, by virtue of having had medical or veterinary training. The time has come for responsible media to stop fawning on these neo-Luddite organizations and give them the treatment they deserve-ignore them.

Otherwise, in order to be consistent, The Scientist should include statements from creationists in every article having to...

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