Yea And Nay

One bravo and two boos for your Oct. 2, 1989, issue. The bravo is for the article “Science Fellows Lend Expertise While Learning Politics” [page 17], which was very well done. One aspect that you did not mention, however, is that the midcareer fellows who return to their. former institutions (often a tenured position at a university) may be unsatisfied and have trouble readjusting to that life. Midcareer scientists contemplating applying for one of those fellowships should be forew

Judith Weis
Nov 26, 1989

One bravo and two boos for your Oct. 2, 1989, issue. The bravo is for the article “Science Fellows Lend Expertise While Learning Politics” [page 17], which was very well done. One aspect that you did not mention, however, is that the midcareer fellows who return to their. former institutions (often a tenured position at a university) may be unsatisfied and have trouble readjusting to that life. Midcareer scientists contemplating applying for one of those fellowships should be forewarned that a fellowship year may trigger a midlife crisis.

And now for the boos: The article “New Biomed Labs To Explore Oceans In Pursuit Of Knowledge And Profit” [page 2] had a major. blooper in it. Perhaps author Rex Dalton thinks that Xenopus is a sea urchin, but it certainly would be quite a feat of genetic engineering to turn a frog into a sea urchin.

Furthermore, the article “Six Receive...

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