man having grilled beef ribs
Notable Science Quotes
Taking stock of the CDC's COVID-19 response, the importance of forest science, the evolutionary importance of chewing, and more
Notable Science Quotes
Notable Science Quotes

Taking stock of the CDC's COVID-19 response, the importance of forest science, the evolutionary importance of chewing, and more

Taking stock of the CDC's COVID-19 response, the importance of forest science, the evolutionary importance of chewing, and more

Magazine Issue
Nebula
Wonders Without, Wonders Within
Bob Grant | Sep 14, 2022
As humanity peers ever further into the cosmos, the similarities and differences between our universe and our inner workings emerge.
Newborn baby rats lie in a basket
Mother’s Circadian Rhythms Mirrored in Fetal Rat Brains
Bianca Nogrady | Sep 12, 2022
Before their own central clocks develop, the brains of fetal rats detect their mother’s metabolic cycle to help regulate the expression of certain genes.
Conceptual image showing molecules making up a brain shape
The Noncoding Regulators of the Brain
Christie Wilcox | Sep 12, 2022
Noncoding RNAs are proving to be critical players in the evolution of brain anatomy and cognitive complexity.
3d render Blood cells (depth of field)
William Harvey Revolutionized Our Understanding of Circulation
Dhun Sethna | Sep 12, 2022
A puzzle for millennia, the movement of blood through the body was solved by an English physician in the 17th century, paving the way for modern medical technologies.
Genetic knockout experiments reveal a role for the protein in forming and maintaining synapses between motor neurons and muscle fibers in mice.
Infographic: Vangl2 in Muscles Keeps Neuromuscular Junctions Organized
Catherine Offord | Sep 12, 2022
Genetic knockout experiments reveal a role for the protein in forming and maintaining synapses between motor neurons and muscle fibers in mice.
Neurons and muscle tissue
A Novel Player at the Neuromuscular Junction
Catherine Offord | Sep 12, 2022
The muscle transmembrane protein Vangl2 helps organize the development and maintenance of connections between muscles and motor neurons, a study concludes.
A California coyote above Santa Monica beach
Human Gut Bacteria Show Up in Urban Wildlife
Bianca Nogrady | Sep 12, 2022
The gut microbiomes of city-dwelling animals, including coyotes, lizards, and birds, show similarities to those found in humans who also live in urban environments.
close up programmer student man hand typing on keyboard at computer desktop to input code language into software for study bug and defect of system in classroom , development of technology concept
How to Fix Science's Code Problem
Katarina Zimmer | Sep 12, 2022
Despite increasingly strict journal policies requiring the release of computational code files along with research papers, many scientists remain reluctant to share—underscoring the need for better solutions.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of <em>Meraxes gigas</em>&rsquo;s head
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Sep 12, 2022
See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist
Illustration of RNAs
Infographic: Noncoding RNA in the Brain
Christie Wilcox | Sep 12, 2022
Neurologically important noncoding RNAs come in many shapes and sizes.
Illustration showing assembly Versus Alignment
Infographic: The Sequencing and Assembly of the Human Genome
Brianna Chrisman and Jordan Eizenga | Sep 1, 2022
With ever-advancing genetic technologies, researchers continue to document the genetic code of the human species.
crossword
Ten Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Sep 1, 2022
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse
Illustration showing a puzzle piece of DNA being removed
Large Scientific Collaborations Aim to Complete Human Genome
Brianna Chrisman and Jordan Eizenga | Sep 1, 2022
Thirty years out from the start of the Human Genome Project, researchers have finally finished sequencing the full 3 billion bases of a person’s genetic code. But even a complete reference genome has its shortcomings.
Activists protest. Political riot sign banners, people holding protests placards and manifestation banner. Jobs activist strike, vegetarians meeting or feminist demonstration vector illustration
Unionization Efforts Pick Up Across US Universities
Catherine Offord, Andy Carstens, and Amanda Heidt | Sep 1, 2022
Members of newly certified workers’ organizations at campuses across the US speak about how they achieved official recognition and what they’re planning for the years ahead.
A postcard from the early 1900s depicting an Indigenous midden in Damariscotta, Maine.
Sticks and Bones, Circa 8000 BCE
Dan Robitzski | Sep 1, 2022
Ancient stashes of animal bones, tools, and other artifacts are often dismissed as archaic garbage heaps, but the deposits provide glimpses of the cultural practices and environmental conditions of past Indigenous settlements.
Why gut health matters. Your digestion are important. Horizontal poster. Medical infographic. Stomach function. Editable vector illustration in modern style. Healthcare and scientific concept
Opinion: Splashing Cold Water on Poop Transplants for Weight Loss
Simar Bajaj | Sep 1, 2022
Gut microbiome–based solutions hold promise for addressing obesity, but are they overhyped?
LAKSAMEE CAVE
Clinton Cave Investigates How Brain Cells Communicate
Andy Carstens | Sep 1, 2022
The Middlebury College neuroscientist explores enzymes that affect brain cell development and neurodegeneration.
Illustration of the cerebellum&nbsp;
Infographic: The Cerebellum’s Many Roles Beyond Motor Control
Diana Kwon | Aug 15, 2022
Researchers have discovered that the small structure is involved in language, emotion, and many other high-order brain processes.
To flag neurons that have experienced genotoxic stress, researchers developed an in vivo sensor using an adeno-associated viral vector, called PRISM. Because a cell&rsquo;s DNA damage response (DDR)&mdash;which activates in response to stressors such as environmental toxins or the buildup of misfolded proteins&mdash;also responds to invading pathogens, PRISM has an easier time transfecting cells whose damage response mechanisms are preoccupied with existing DNA damage. Once inside, the virus hijacks the neuron&rsquo;s DNA replication machinery, which reverts an engineered frameshift mutation in the virus and thereby prompts the production of a fluorescent protein that can be observed via microscopy.
Infographic: DNA Damage Viewed with Unprecedented Clarity
Amanda Heidt | Aug 15, 2022
A new genetic sensor called PRISM makes use of a host cell’s DNA replication machinery to trigger fluorescence in neurons with damaged DNA.