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A colored microscopy image showing cells that are dying in yellow and healthy cells in blue
Sweet Taste Receptors Regulate Proteins in Developing Fruit Flies
An unexpected find shows that sweet-sensing receptors also help epithelial cells in Drosophila larvae stay alive amid proteotoxic stress.
Sweet Taste Receptors Regulate Proteins in Developing Fruit Flies
Sweet Taste Receptors Regulate Proteins in Developing Fruit Flies

An unexpected find shows that sweet-sensing receptors also help epithelial cells in Drosophila larvae stay alive amid proteotoxic stress.

An unexpected find shows that sweet-sensing receptors also help epithelial cells in Drosophila larvae stay alive amid proteotoxic stress.

Magazine Issue
Illustration showing immunology during pregnancy
Infographic: How Immunology Can Influence Pregnancy Outcomes
Tobias R. Kollmann, Arnaud Marchant, and Sing Sing Way | Nov 14, 2022 | 3 min read
Pregnancy-induced changes in the immune system are key to a successful birth. Understanding those changes could allow researchers to protect both mother and child.
(Left) The optic lobes are thought to be involved in visual processing. In this study, researchers found that guppies with larger optic lobes more quickly learned a visual discrimination task—identifying which color well contained food. (Right) The fish telencephalon is thought to be involved in spatial learning, memory, and inhibitory control. Here, the researchers found that a larger telencephalon might enhance the fish’s cognitive flexibility, allowing them to more quickly associate food with a new color after the researchers switched it.
Infographic: Two Guppy Brain Regions May Help Them Learn Tasks
Natalia Mesa | Nov 14, 2022 | 1 min read
While guppies with larger optic lobes were champions at learning visual discrimination tasks, guppies with larger telencephalons fared better when researchers switched things up.
Illustration of pregnancy and the immune system
Modulating Immunity to Improve Pregnancy Outcomes
Tobias R. Kollmann, Arnaud Marchant, and Sing Sing Way | Nov 14, 2022 | 10+ min read
Aberrant immune activation, the main cause of prematurity and stillbirths, could be preventable through interventions such as maternal vaccination. 
An international team of scientists used sensitive instruments to show that oil from human skin reacts with ozone to generate potent, free radicals. These chemicals can further react with most organic compounds present in the indoor environment to produce dangerous pollutants. 
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Nov 14, 2022 | 3 min read
See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist
Photo of a Guppy fish
Fish Brain Region Size Correlates with Cognitive Flexibility
Natalia Mesa | Nov 14, 2022 | 3 min read
The relative sizes of specific parts of the guppy brain may explain why some fish are better at learning certain tasks than others. 
Illustration of a green lab
Green Lab Initiatives Take Root Around the World
Natalia Mesa | Nov 14, 2022 | 9 min read
Scientists, students, and administrative staff are working to bring about a cultural shift to mitigate the impact of research on the environment.
Cover of <em>Pests.</em>
Opinion: Are Cats Friends or Fiends?
Bethany Brookshire | Nov 14, 2022 | 4 min read
In Pests: How Humans Create Animal Villains, I explore what it is that makes an animal a pest—and it has nothing to do with their behavior, but rather our own desires and beliefs about the natural world.
A closeup of a dead frog floating in water with aquatic plants underneath it
Chytrid Fungus Deploys Varying Strategies to Infect Amphibians
Tess Joosse | Nov 14, 2022 | 2 min read
The ability to activate different sets of genes has likely helped the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis spread widely in amphibians, resulting in global population declines. 
Three grasshoppers
How a Grasshopper Gave Up Sex, Took Up Cloning
Dan Robitzski | Nov 1, 2022 | 5 min read
Meet the grasshopper that has reproduced asexually for a quarter of a million years—without acquiring undue numbers of harmful mutations.
Image of Gollum
Opinion: The Problem with Researchers Hoarding Resources
Jose Valdez and Sandeep Sharma | Nov 1, 2022 | 4 min read
For too long, some scientists have acted like Gollums of the ivory tower, guarding precious study sites, model organisms, and even entire fields of inquiry.
Photo of Steve Ramirez
Steve Ramirez Reshapes Memories in the Brains of Mice
Dan Robitzski | Nov 1, 2022 | 3 min read
The Boston University neuroscientist wants to take the edge off traumatic memories by manipulating how they’re processed in the brain.
Fernanda, a Fernandina giant tortoise (<em>Chelonoidis phantasticus</em>), was identified in 2019, decades after her species supposedly went extinct.
When an Extinct Species Is Found Alive, What Happens Next?
Andy Carstens | Nov 1, 2022 | 6 min read
Finding a creature in the wild that had been considered long gone brings hope—and quite a bit of uncertainty.
Illustration from the epigenetics and the genome infographic
Infographic: How Epigenetic Marks Can Change the Genome
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Although epigenetic changes were long thought to largely act on the genome, rather than as part of it, research is now showing that these patterns can, directly or indirectly, change the genetic code.
In the 1920s, the Institute for Sexual Research in Berlin was a haven for queer people, many of whom came to the institute seeking to express their identities without fear of being imprisoned. This undated photo depicts a costume party at the institute; its founder, Magnus Hirschfeld (second from right, in glasses), can be seen holding hands with his partner, Karl Giese (center).
Trans Medicine, 1919
Natalia Mesa | Nov 1, 2022 | 3 min read
German physician and sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld founded a revolutionary clinic where transgender people could receive gender-affirming care, but he left behind a complicated medical and scientific legacy.
Cellular DNA and epigenetics
Do Epigenetic Changes Influence Evolution?
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Evidence is mounting that epigenetic marks on DNA can influence future generations in a variety of ways. But how such phenomena might affect large-scale evolutionary processes is hotly debated.
Modified cover of Epigenetics in Evolution.
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon | Nov 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse
A mesquite tree in an arid environment
Climate Change May Favor Nitrogen-Fixing Plants
Andy Carstens | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
Aridity appears to configure landscapes with a greater diversity of plant species that rely on symbiotic bacteria for nitrogen.
Brightly colored birds resting on a tree
Opinion: Biodiversity Loss Worsened by Extinguishing Animal Innovators
Carol Gigliotti | Oct 17, 2022 | 4 min read
When species disappear, more than their genomes are lost. The potential for their creative innovation to benefit ecosystems vanishes as well.
3D imaging of organoid
Infographic: Generating Hundreds of 3D Organoid Images per Hour
Natalia Mesa | Oct 17, 2022 | 1 min read
By modifying a technique used to image single cells, researchers have managed to generate a super-resolution 3D image of a complete organoid in just seven seconds.
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