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A smiling woman holds a young child outside in the park.
A Stranger to Oneself: The Mystery of Fetal Microchimerism
During pregnancy, fetal cells invade maternal tissues and can persist for decades, but the effects of these non-self cells remain largely obscure.
A Stranger to Oneself: The Mystery of Fetal Microchimerism
A Stranger to Oneself: The Mystery of Fetal Microchimerism

During pregnancy, fetal cells invade maternal tissues and can persist for decades, but the effects of these non-self cells remain largely obscure.

During pregnancy, fetal cells invade maternal tissues and can persist for decades, but the effects of these non-self cells remain largely obscure.

News & Opinion

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