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Photo of a line of grassy plants with the roots under the soil visible.
Plants Defend Themselves Against Heavy Metals
A metabolite from maize roots protects the plants against arsenic toxicity.
Plants Defend Themselves Against Heavy Metals
Plants Defend Themselves Against Heavy Metals

A metabolite from maize roots protects the plants against arsenic toxicity.

A metabolite from maize roots protects the plants against arsenic toxicity.

News & Opinion

3D cubes showing letters representing the four DNA bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine) and small DNA helices.
Discovering the Functions of Noncoding Sequence Variants
Niki Spahich, PhD | Jun 12, 2024 | 4 min read
Neville Sanjana explored noncoding genomic regions by combining pooled CRISPR screening and single cell sequencing.
Fluorescent microscopy image with a black background and blue, green, and red colors marking different cells.
A Safe-Haven for Intestinal Viruses
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Jun 11, 2024 | 4 min read
A rare gut cell puzzles researchers by avoiding immune cells.
A light blue circular double helix against a dark blue background.
Artificial Chromosomes for Disease Modeling
Holly Barker, PhD | Jun 12, 2024 | 3 min read
A new technique for synthesizing chromosomes can introduce panels of genes into disease models to facilitate drug testing.
3D illustration of purple neurons.
An Immune Mechanism Maintains Memory
Shelby Bradford, PhD | Jun 10, 2024 | 4 min read
A receptor that recognizes DNA fragments formed during learning is necessary for proper memory formation.
Microscopy image of an ovary labeled with blue, green, and yellow fluorescent markers.
A Cellular Roadmap for Fertility
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Jun 6, 2024 | 4 min read
Researchers created a spatial atlas of rare cell types in the ovaries.
Graphic depicting the microbiota consisting of various blue and red bacterial cells
Boosting Bacterial Genomes to Better Explore the Microbiome
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Jun 7, 2024 | 4 min read
Gang Fang’s new metagenomics method helps sequence rare bacteria.
A 3D microscopic image of a heart tissue section with cardiac myocytes and macrophages.
Taking Out the Trash: An Alternative Cellular Disposal Pathway
Charlene Lancaster, PhD | Jun 6, 2024 | 4 min read
Researchers reveal that cellular secretion removes defective mitochondria when lysosomes are dysfunctional.
Cartoon of clock faces arranged in the shape of a brain.
Human Neurons Play the Waiting Game
Shelby Bradford, PhD | Jun 5, 2024 | 4 min read
When it comes to development, an epigenetic clock may be responsible for human neurons’ slower maturation.
Four circular maps of color-coded immune cell types corresponding to the four tumor microenvironment archetypes.
A Bird’s Eye View of the Tumor Microenvironment
Kamal Nahas, PhD | Jun 3, 2024 | 3 min read
Immune cells form different communities throughout a tumor, potentially disrupting how cancers respond to treatments.
Images of tumor organoids acquired using high-speed live cell interferometry.
Evaluating Tumor Heterogeneity with a High Throughput Pipeline
Charlene Lancaster, PhD | Jun 3, 2024 | 3 min read
An automated bioprinting and imaging platform allows researchers to examine heterogeneous responses to anticancer drugs within a tumor organoid population.
Snake slithering across dirt. 
Snaking Towards Synthetic Antivenoms
Danielle Gerhard, PhD | May 31, 2024 | 6 min read
After more than a century of producing animal-based antivenoms, scientists turned to synthetic systems to develop safer and more effective snake bite treatments.
A 3D spherical neutrophil animation with a pink, polysegmented nucleus
The Nucleus’ Secret to Shapeshifting
Kamal Nahas, PhD | May 31, 2024 | 4 min read
Neutrophils contort their nuclei into various shapes by moderating one key regulatory protein previously shown to orchestrate DNA organization.
Several X-shaped duplicated chromosomes floating on a blurry blue background.
Centromeres Mutate More Rapidly Than Expected
Kamal Nahas, PhD | May 30, 2024 | 4 min read
After sequencing centromeres in humans and other primates, researchers found that they vary greatly across species and potentially contribute to aging and disease.
A Hydractinia polyp with stinging cells shown in red throughout the body and the tentacles.
With Neither Brains nor Brawn, Jellyfish and Relatives Developed Subcellular Weapons Instead
Hannah Thomasy, PhD | May 29, 2024 | 6 min read
Anna Klompen explained how cnidarian stinging cells harpooned their way into her heart and could help answer fundamental questions in biology.
Green bacteria on a blue background.
Mutations Wire Salmonella to Last
Mariella Bodemeier Loayza Careaga, PhD | May 28, 2024 | 4 min read
Genetic changes attenuated Salmonella’s virulence, potentially enabling the bacteria to cause chronic infections in humans.
Brown and black flat-coated retrievers sit on a path in the woods.
Obesity Research is Going to the Dogs
Hannah Thomasy, PhD | May 27, 2024 | 5 min read
Gene mutations in rotund retrievers shed light on the neural regulation of body weight.
3D rendered spheroids floating on a blue background.
Developing Homogenous 3D Neural Cultures for High Throughput Screening
Niki Spahich, PhD | May 23, 2024 | 3 min read
Brain region-specific spheroids help scientists find new compounds to treat opioid use disorder and more.
An illustration showing the DNA inside an immune cell. Other immune cells are shown in the background. 
Keeping CAR T Cells Sharp 
Aparna Nathan, PhD | May 21, 2024 | 4 min read
The FOXO1 transcription factor boosts T cells’ memory and reduces dysfunction.
Image of a stem cell and DNA against a light background.
Using Genetic Cartography to Map Cell Lineage
Laura Tran, PhD | May 17, 2024 | 4 min read
By coupling cell lineage tracking with molecular gene expression patterns, researchers deciphered how gene activity influences immune cell production.
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