NIH Changes Extension Policy to Better Support Women PIs
NIH Changes Extension Policy to Better Support Women PIs
The revision allows more time on previous extensions due to COVID-19 and other life events such as childbirth that disproportionately impact early-career women in science.  
NIH Changes Extension Policy to Better Support Women PIs
NIH Changes Extension Policy to Better Support Women PIs

The revision allows more time on previous extensions due to COVID-19 and other life events such as childbirth that disproportionately impact early-career women in science.  

The revision allows more time on previous extensions due to COVID-19 and other life events such as childbirth that disproportionately impact early-career women in science.  

News & Opinion
Salty Diet Helps Gut Bugs Fight Cancer in Mice: Study
Salty Diet Helps Gut Bugs Fight Cancer in Mice: Study
Sophie Fessl | Sep 20, 2021
A high-salt diet suppressed the growth of tumors in a mouse model of melanoma, apparently because of an interplay between the gut microbiome and natural killer cells.
Morphine Tolerance Pathway Identified in Mice
Morphine Tolerance Pathway Identified in Mice
David Adam | Sep 20, 2021
Prolonged exposure to morphine triggers cells in the spine to release signaling molecules that increase pain sensitivity and dull the relief of the drug. Blocking this activity could improve pain management.
Serious Infections Linked to Autism: Study
Serious Infections Linked to Autism: Study
Abby Olena | Sep 17, 2021
In both a mouse model and the hospital records of more than 3 million children, researchers found a connection between strong immune activation in males and later symptoms of autism spectrum disorder.
To Booster or Not: Scientists and Regulators Debate
To Booster or Not: Scientists and Regulators Debate
Jef Akst | Sep 16, 2021
President Biden’s planned rollout of additional COVID-19 vaccine doses is set to begin next week, but questions remain about who should get them.
NIH Grants $470 Million for Study of Long COVID
NIH Grants $470 Million for Study of Long COVID
Lisa Winter | Sep 16, 2021
The study aims to recruit 40,000 adults and children to get a better sense of the condition that can last weeks or months after infection.
Researchers Uncover New Families of Gene-Editing Enzymes
Researchers Uncover New Families of Gene-Editing Enzymes
Annie Melchor | Sep 15, 2021
The results reveal evolutionary relatives of the Cas9 enzyme now used extensively in biotechnology.
Accurate Protein Production Promotes Longevity
Accurate Protein Production Promotes Longevity
Ruth Williams | Sep 15, 2021
Worms, flies, and yeast live longer if the fidelity of their protein-making machinery is improved, a study shows.
Potty Party: Researchers Show Young Cows Can Be Toilet-Trained
Potty Party: Researchers Show Young Cows Can Be Toilet-Trained
Annie Melchor | Sep 14, 2021
Ethologist Jan Langbein and his team trained the cattle as a way to keep solid and liquid cattle waste separate—with the goal of reducing ammonia emissions coming from livestock.
2021 Ig Nobel Prizes Honor Decongestant Orgasms, Rhino Transport
2021 Ig Nobel Prizes Honor Decongestant Orgasms, Rhino Transport
Lisa Winter | Sep 14, 2021
A full beard can absorb nearly 40 percent of the shock from a punch to the face, according to one winning study.
Louisiana Scientists Are Still Reeling from Ida
Louisiana Scientists Are Still Reeling from Ida
Emma Yasinski | Sep 14, 2021
Some Louisiana research centers lost samples and reagents, and with power only just now being restored, there’s a long road ahead to full recovery.
Updated
Wealthier Nations Disregarding WHO Call for COVID-19 Booster Moratorium
Wealthier Nations Disregarding WHO Call for COVID-19 Booster Moratorium
Christie Wilcox | Aug 5, 2021
The organization implored nations to wait on booster shots until the global vaccination rate increases, but several of the world’s more well-off countries have expressed their intentions to offer them regardless.
Putative Exercise Hormone Irisin Boosts Mouse Brainpower
Putative Exercise Hormone Irisin Boosts Mouse Brainpower
Sophie Fessl | Sep 10, 2021
Mice lacking irisin didn’t exhibit the cognition improvements that typically follow exercise, and in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, treatment with the hormone reduced cognitive decline.
A Surge in Pandemic Research Shines a Spotlight on Preprints
A Surge in Pandemic Research Shines a Spotlight on Preprints
Diana Kwon | Sep 10, 2021
Many scientists have turned to preprints to rapidly disseminate their research on COVID-19, but some disagree with this approach.
Years of Prozac Alter Lipids in Young Monkeys’ Brains: Study
Years of Prozac Alter Lipids in Young Monkeys’ Brains: Study
James M. Gaines | Sep 10, 2021
Long-term administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine was tied to decreased concentrations of about 100 different brain lipids in adolescent macaques, hinting at a potential mechanism underlying the drug’s rare but severe side effects.
Tumors Disrupt the Blood-Brain Barrier at a Distance
Tumors Disrupt the Blood-Brain Barrier at a Distance
Abby Olena | Sep 9, 2021
Shoring up the tissues that separate neurons and other brain cells from the circulatory system in fruit flies and mice can prolong life in the presence of a tumor.
Opinion: An Alternative to Injection
Opinion: An Alternative to Injection
Carmine D’Amico, Hélder Santos | Sep 9, 2021
Research on microneedle patches for vaccine delivery has grown in popularity in recent years, due to their exceptional compliance and low invasiveness.
How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
Amanda Heidt | Sep 8, 2021
As fires blanket growing swathes of the West, scientists are beginning to understand more about how their smoke affects the transmission and severity of COVID-19 and other illnesses, and how it differs from that of other types of air pollution.
Q&A: Health of 9/11 First Responders 20 Years Later
Q&A: Health of 9/11 First Responders 20 Years Later
Amanda Heidt | Sep 7, 2021
The Scientist spoke with Rachel Zeig-Owens, the director of epidemiology for the World Trade Center Health Program, about what scientists have learned after two decades of studying illness and disease among survivors.
What We Know About Mu, the WHO’s Latest Variant of Interest
What We Know About Mu, the WHO’s Latest Variant of Interest
Christie Wilcox | Sep 7, 2021
The SARS-CoV-2 variant was first detected in January, but its rising prevalence and potential resistance to vaccines has garnered it special attention from the World Health Organization.