Menu

ISTOCK, KKOLOSOV

Effort to Reproduce Cancer Studies Scales Down to 18 Papers

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology initially aimed to replicate the results of 50 high-impact research articles.

Aug 1, 2018
Diana Kwon

A large effort to reproduce high-impact cancer research has scaled down the number of studies it plans to replicate from 50 to 18, Science reported yesterday (July 31). 

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (RP:CP) was launched by the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, a biotechnology company, in 2013. The project’s initial aim was to replicate experiments from 50 high-profile cancer papers published between 2010 and 2012. Starting in 2015, however, organizers began to pare down the number of papers due to budgetary and resource constraints. 

See “Replication Complications

“I wish we could have done more,” Tim Errington, a biologist who runs RP:CP from the Center for Open Science, tells Science. “There is an element of not truly understanding how challenging it is until you do a project like this.”

Hurdles to replicating experiments included a lack of detailed protocols and easily obtainable reagents. “Communication and sharing are low-hanging fruit that we can work on to improve,” Elizabeth Iorns, the president of Science Exchange, tells Science. 

To date, RP:CP has published 10 of the 18 replication studies in eLife. Two of the studies failed to replicate and two were inconclusive; project members were able to reproduce at least parts of the experiments from the remaining six. According to Science, the original findings from many of the 50 papers RP:CP planned to replicate have already been confirmed by other independent groups. 

RP:CP also decided to discontinue 11 ongoing replication efforts, but plans to publish the findings from those incomplete studies. 

See “Latest Reproducibility Project Study Fails to Replicate

November 2018

Intelligent Science

Wrapping our heads around human smarts

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Norgen Biotek Achieves Illumina Propel Certification as a Service Provider for Next Generation Sequencing

Norgen Biotek Achieves Illumina Propel Certification as a Service Provider for Next Generation Sequencing

Norgen Biotek Corp., an innovative privately held Canadian biotechnology company focusing primarily on nucleic acid and protein stabilization and purification, as well as providing high quality services to the scientific community, today announced that it has become Propel-Certified through Illumina as a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) service provider.

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice cutting tools—which feature our patent-pending safety blades—meet many lab-specific requirements. Our scalpels and craft knives are well suited for delicate work, and our utility knives are good for general use.

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

Every minute counts when waiting for accurate diagnostic test results to guide critical care decisions, making today's clinical lab more important than ever. In fact, nearly 70 percent of critical care decisions are driven by a diagnostic test.