Menu

First New Tuberculosis Drug Approved in 50 Years

The US Food and Drug Administration green lights a therapy for an extreme form of multidrug resistant TB.

Aug 15, 2019
Jef Akst
© ISTOCK.COM, DR_MICROBE

A treatment regimen for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis could help stem the growing problem of hard-to-treat TB infections in developing countries, according to the Associated Press. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration yesterday (August 14), the therapy includes two existing drugs, Johnson & Johnson’s bedaquiline and linezolid, and a new antibiotic called pretomanid—only the third new TB drug in nearly half a century to reach the market.

In clinical trials for extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB, nearly 90 percent of patients receiving the medication recovered after six months of treatment—almost three times the success rate of current treatment options, which involve taking antibiotic cocktails for up to two years.

Pretomanid was developed by the nonprofit TB Alliance. “One definite advantage of a not-for-profit is you don’t have to look at things like returning your profits into shareholders,” Mel Spigelman, president and chief executive of TB Alliance, tells The Washington Post. Helen Boucher, a professor of medicine at Tufts Medical Center and director of the Tufts Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance, agrees, telling the publication: “There isn’t a market to sell [a TB drug] to make money, so it was imperative that a nonprofit take that on.”

TB Alliance has licensed the therapy to Pennsylvania-based pharma company Mylan NV to manufacture and sell pretomanid. “We will focus on the United States and in countries where there is a high burden of extensively drug-resistant TB, the majority of which are low and middle-income markets,” a Mylan spokeswoman tells Reuters. TB Alliance has also filed for approval of pretomanid as part of a combo regimen for TB with European regulatory authorities.

Jef Akst is the managing editor of The Scientist. Email her at jakst@the-scientist.com

September 2019

Our Inner Neanderthal

Ancient secrets in the human genome

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Evaluating the Functional Potency of Immunotherapies Targeting Tumors of B Cell Origin
Evaluating the Functional Potency of Immunotherapies Targeting Tumors of B Cell Origin
Download this application note to learn how the ACEA xCELLigence system can evaluate the potency of an immunotherapy against a broad spectrum of liquid tumors and monitor the destruction kinetics of liquid cancers at physiologically relevant effector:target cell ratios.
Kinetics of Tumor Cell Killing by Tumor-Infiltrating Leukocytes
Kinetics of Tumor Cell Killing by Tumor-Infiltrating Leukocytes
Watch this webinar to learn how Dr. Cara Haymaker and her team are assessing the reactivity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and modulating the mechanisms of resistance to therapy and exploring biomarkers involved in the response.
Atlas Antibodies Presents QPrEST Standards for Absolute Quantification of Proteins using Mass Spectrometry
Atlas Antibodies Presents QPrEST Standards for Absolute Quantification of Proteins using Mass Spectrometry
Atlas Antibodies AB, a leading supplier of advanced research reagents, announced today the introduction of pre-quantified QPrEST™ Protein Standards for absolute quantification of proteins in biological samples such as cell lysate and plasma using liquid chromatography (LC)–mass spectrometry (MS).
BIA Separations introduces Cornerstone AAV Process Development Service to accelerate gene therapy production
BIA Separations introduces Cornerstone AAV Process Development Service to accelerate gene therapy production
CORNERSTONE program integrates process development expertise and novel technology to remove development bottlenecks in the manufacture of Gene Therapy Medicinal Products (GTMPs). Portfolio includes novel CIMasphere™ technology for higher yielding processes and safer products in AAV-based programs