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Colin Blakemore

Colin Blakemore's boundless energy—physical and intellectual—is quite fitting in a man who has run 18 marathons. His preference to be addressed as Colin (no honorifics please!) is in keeping with his quiet and unassuming manner, which is all the more impressive in a man who has created the equivalent of two parallel careers—one in neuroscience and the other in science communication. Blakemore got off to an exceptionally early and impressive start in both vocations—he comp

Arlene Judith Klotzko
Colin Blakemore's boundless energy—physical and intellectual—is quite fitting in a man who has run 18 marathons. His preference to be addressed as Colin (no honorifics please!) is in keeping with his quiet and unassuming manner, which is all the more impressive in a man who has created the equivalent of two parallel careers—one in neuroscience and the other in science communication.

Blakemore got off to an exceptionally early and impressive start in both vocations—he completed his PhD in less than 30 months—and he achieved great success while still in his 30s. In 1976, he delivered the Reith Lectures for the BBC, and in 1979, he accepted the Waynflete chair of physiology at Oxford University—both the sorts of honors given to those 20 years his senior. He directs the Medical Research Council Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience. Currently, Blakemore is chairman of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (he...

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