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60 Members Elected to NAS

Editor's Note: On May 2, the National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 60 new members and 15 foreign associates from nine countries in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Nearly half of the new members are life scientists. In this article, The Scientist presents photographs of some of the new members and comments from a few of them on their careers and on past and current research. A full directory of NAS members can be found online a

Barry Palevitz

Editor's Note: On May 2, the National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 60 new members and 15 foreign associates from nine countries in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Nearly half of the new members are life scientists. In this article, The Scientist presents photographs of some of the new members and comments from a few of them on their careers and on past and current research. A full directory of NAS members can be found online at www.nas.edu/nas.

 

Father of a Discipline


If fathering an entire discipline qualifies a scientist for membership in the National Academy of Sciences, then Indiana University's Jeffrey Palmer rated election hands down. A lot of people would agree with Indiana colleague Loren Rieseberg: "Palmer almost singlehandedly created the rapidly growing field of molecular plant systematics." That's pretty good for somebody who, Palmer says, "waited till...

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