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A Botanist In Newspaperland

Ask a scientist about the media and you will get an opinion. But what do they actually know about it? They see the products, newspapers, TV programs, radio broadcasts, and may even have had their own work featured at some time, more or less accurately. But their conception of how these things actually come into being usually is extremely hazy, and the media itself does little to dispel the veil over this creative process. The British Association for the Advancement of Science coordinates a pr

Meriel Jones
Ask a scientist about the media and you will get an opinion. But what do they actually know about it? They see the products, newspapers, TV programs, radio broadcasts, and may even have had their own work featured at some time, more or less accurately. But their conception of how these things actually come into being usually is extremely hazy, and the media itself does little to dispel the veil over this creative process.

The British Association for the Advancement of Science coordinates a program that hopes to remove some of this ignorance. Instead of allowing scientists to study the media as sociologists have done for years, or just complain about science coverage, why not give some scientists the chance to be media people and see how they make out? Like many human activities, from driving a car to adjusting the pH of a solution, it is difficult to appreciate...

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