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A Controversy That Will Not Die: The Role Of HIV In Causing AIDS

While the most quoted dissenter says the virus plays no part, there is a broad diversity of opinion in the scientific community on its function. When the journal Science ran an eight-page special report in December, it got a lot of attention which, after all, is what special reports are intended for. But this one, devoted to a single researcher, was highly unusual. Called "The Duesberg Phenomenon," it presented University of California, Berkeley, retrovirologist Peter Duesberg's unorthodox vie

Billy Goodman


While the most quoted dissenter says the virus plays no part, there is a broad diversity of opinion in the scientific community on its function.
When the journal Science ran an eight-page special report in December, it got a lot of attention which, after all, is what special reports are intended for. But this one, devoted to a single researcher, was highly unusual. Called "The Duesberg Phenomenon," it presented University of California, Berkeley, retrovirologist Peter Duesberg's unorthodox views of AIDS causation (J. Cohen, Science, 266:1642-9, 1994).

Duesberg, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, does not believe that HIV causes AIDS defining-diseases (see Opinion, page 12). Virtually all American AIDS cases, he wrote in Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy in 1992 (46:3-15), are the result of recreational and anti-HIV drugs. In its December 9 issue, Science considered Duesberg's views seriously and went to great length...

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