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AAAS Speakers Pose The Question: Can We Fill The Science Pipeline?

156th national meeting explores ways to attract a new generation into the field as 6,000 scientists gather in New Orleans. WASHINGTON--This year, perhaps more earnestly than ever before, participants at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will wrestle with the problem of how to ensure that there are enough scientists pursuing the quest for knowledge in the 21st century. The 156th national meeting runs from Feb. 15 through Feb. 20 in New Orleans. For th

The Scientist Staff


156th national meeting explores ways to attract a new generation into the field as 6,000 scientists gather in New Orleans.
WASHINGTON--This year, perhaps more earnestly than ever before, participants at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will wrestle with the problem of how to ensure that there are enough scientists pursuing the quest for knowledge in the 21st century. The 156th national meeting runs from Feb. 15 through Feb. 20 in New Orleans.

For the third consecutive year, the association's presidential address will be devoted to the topic. Richard Atkinson, chancellor of the University of California, San Diego, explores a "human resources crisis in science" and asks the questions: "Can It Be Averted? Can It Be Resolved?" Last year, in San Francisco, University of Chicago physicist Walter Massey challenged his colleagues to find ways to attract and retain greater numbers of students, especially minorities,...

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