African American Genome Mappers Pledge To Carry On Despite Grant Rejection

Researchers working on a large-scale plan to develop a linkage map of the genome of African Americans a project similar to the Human Genome Project (HGP)_vow to continue their efforts, despite being rejected for funding by the National Institutes of Health. As they pursue other sources of funding, they say they will carry on with the project in a loosely associated alliance of smaller research efforts at Howard University and other institutions. "It is just too important a project to be dismant

Neeraja Sankaran
Mar 5, 1995

Researchers working on a large-scale plan to develop a linkage map of the genome of African Americans a project similar to the Human Genome Project (HGP)_vow to continue their efforts, despite being rejected for funding by the National Institutes of Health.

As they pursue other sources of funding, they say they will carry on with the project in a loosely associated alliance of smaller research efforts at Howard University and other institutions.

"It is just too important a project to be dismantled," declares Fatimah Jackson, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Maryland, College Park. "We're hoping to get funding from different sources and continue with our efforts to carry out different components of the research."

The project_to identify marker genes and thereby survey genomic diversity within the African American population_was the brainchild of Georgia Dunston, an associate professor of microbiology at Howard University. The basic premise for...

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