After 5 Years, Heated Controversy Persists In Science Copyright Case

Weissmann v. Freeman battle is revived as Dingell subcommittee decides to launch a new investigation Since the age of two, Heidi Weissmann says, she always wanted to be a doctor. She started college when she was 15, began medical school when she was 19, and by age 30 her supervisor was calling her one of the nation's premier authorities on biliary imaging in nuclear medicine. Yet now, at age 41, Weissmann is unemployed. Since 1987, she has claimed the United States radiological community has b

Ron Kaufman
Sep 13, 1992


Weissmann v. Freeman battle is revived as Dingell subcommittee decides to launch a new investigation
Since the age of two, Heidi Weissmann says, she always wanted to be a doctor. She started college when she was 15, began medical school when she was 19, and by age 30 her supervisor was calling her one of the nation's premier authorities on biliary imaging in nuclear medicine.

Yet now, at age 41, Weissmann is unemployed. Since 1987, she has claimed the United States radiological community has blackballed her from continuing her research. This summer, the case took a new turn, when Congress began investigating her charges for the second time. Weissmann's situation involves a five-year legal battle against her former employer, Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, N.Y., over sex discrimination, and against her former lab chief, Leonard Freeman, a professor of nuclear medicine, over copyright infringement. Her story has compelled House Energy...

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