Aggressive Promotional Blitz Aims To Shake SSC's Pork Barrel Image

As enthusiastic support for the superconducting supercollider cools off, advocates step up efforts to save the megaproject Proponents of the superconducting supercollider are mounting a vigorous public relations campaign to win over Congress and the United States public and to head off a repeat of last summer's House vote to kill the $8.3 billion project. Funding for the Dallas-based SSC was restored last year only through the 11th-hour mobilization of dozens of physicists to converge

Scott Veggeberg
May 30, 1993

As enthusiastic support for the superconducting supercollider cools off, advocates step up efforts to save the megaproject


Proponents of the superconducting supercollider are mounting a vigorous public relations campaign to win over Congress and the United States public and to head off a repeat of last summer's House vote to kill the $8.3 billion project.

Funding for the Dallas-based SSC was restored last year only through the 11th-hour mobilization of dozens of physicists to converge on Congress (Scott Veggeberg, The Scientist, Sept. 28, 1992, page 1).

This year, supercollider supporters from both industry and academia are getting their campaign rolling early. And the efforts are beginning to pay off, says Jerry Staub, executive director of the National Association for the Superconducting Super Collider, an SSC-promoting industry association. This organization--with financial support from SSC contractors like St. Louis-based General Dynamics Corp. and Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Corp.--has "hit the floor running" with...

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