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AGI Survey: Job Market For Geology Grads Looks Promising

Starting salaries for new geology graduates, especially those entering environmental fields or the domestic oil and gas industries, are rising, according to a recently compiled survey by the Alexandria, Va.-based American Geological Institute. AGI's latest annual survey of starting salaries for inexperienced graduates, released this month, projected that geologists with master's and doctoral degrees beginning work in 1990 would reap the highest increases over the starting salaries paid to their

Edward Silverman
Starting salaries for new geology graduates, especially those entering environmental fields or the domestic oil and gas industries, are rising, according to a recently compiled survey by the Alexandria, Va.-based American Geological Institute. AGI's latest annual survey of starting salaries for inexperienced graduates, released this month, projected that geologists with master's and doctoral degrees beginning work in 1990 would reap the highest increases over the starting salaries paid to their counterparts who began work in 1989.

For instance, AGI projected that master's grads beginning work in the domestic oil and gas industries in 1990 would be paid a median of $37,250, a figure that is 11 percent higher than the median salary for 1989 grads. Similarly, the median starting salaries for geologists starting work in academia in 1990 were projected to be 10.7 percent higher than the salaries for those who began academic jobs in 1989; the association forecasted that...

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