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Air Force's Basic Research Flies Off in New Directions

WASHINGTON—If Air Force pilots one day are able to use their brains’ internal chemistry to combat fatigue and stay alert during long periods of stress, the achievement will be the result of intensive research by military scientists. But it will also be due to a phone call that program manager Bill Berry made in the fall of 1982 to MIT neuroscientist Richard Wurtman. WASHINGTON--DC The National Institutes of Health has created an adminstrative structure for directing what could

Daniel Charles

WASHINGTON—If Air Force pilots one day are able to use their brains’ internal chemistry to combat fatigue and stay alert during long periods of stress, the achievement will be the result of intensive research by military scientists. But it will also be due to a phone call that program manager Bill Berry made in the fall of 1982 to MIT neuroscientist Richard Wurtman.

WASHINGTON--DC The National Institutes of Health has created an adminstrative structure for directing what could become a $3 billion, 15-year effort to map and sequence the human genome.

NIH officials are recruiting an associate director to head a new office. Money for the project will be listed separately in future NIH budgets, partly to highlight the extent of activity and partly to defuse criticism that a massive federal effort could siphon off individual investigators’ money.

The new office was one of several recommendations endorsed earlier this month...

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