Another First-Class Journal for Biologists?

THE FASEB JOURNAL Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Vol. 1, nos.1, 2 and 3, Rockville, MD, 1987. The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), in an apparent attempt to make a greater impact on biological science, has replaced its Federation Proceedings with The FASEB Journal. No longer limited to abstracts and programs of annual meetings and occasional symposia, the new journal is designed to be interdisciplinary,

Jan 25, 1988
Sidney Udenfriend
THE FASEB
JOURNAL

Official Publication of the Federation
of American Societies for
Experimental Biology. Vol. 1, nos.1, 2 and 3,
Rockville, MD, 1987.

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), in an apparent attempt to make a greater impact on biological science, has replaced its Federation Proceedings with The FASEB Journal. No longer limited to abstracts and programs of annual meetings and occasional symposia, the new journal is designed to be interdisciplinary, comparable to Science and Nature but limited to biology. It aims to publish exciting and definitive new advances rapidly while reaching a large audience (with a circulation of 24,000). Scheduled to appear monthly, the publication is actually very similar in format to Science and Nature, including editorials, scientific news, book reviews, employment and general advertising, and more.

A sampling of the first few issues of The FASEB Journal, which debuted in July 1987, reveals interesting reviews and research communications, unique detailed announcements of worldwide biological meetings through late 1988 (more than 100 listings), an excellent obituary for Fritz Lipmann written by Christian de Duve, a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society of Physiology entitled “Molecular Biology in Physiology,” and an excellent editorial, ‘Strengthening Biomedical Sciences and Institutions.” The longer articles were written by excellent scientists; those in my areas of interest, however, seemed a bit too short. The journal devoted roughly the same number of pages to biological sciences as did issues of Science and Nature published in the same time frame, but unfortunately, it did not contain the more interesting communications.

Although the journal has a long way to go before it compares to some of the more established scientific journals, its appearance is important to the biological community. The plans expressed by FASEB for the journal are excellent, the format is good and, with University of Miami biochemist William Whelan as its editor, there is every reason to believe that The FASEB Journal will become another first-class multidisciplinary journal for biologists.

Udenfriend is head of the Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology at the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology, Nutley, NJ 07110


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(The Scientist, Vol:2, #2, p.19, January 25, 1988)
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