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Are Scientific Societies Diverted By Their Cash Cows?

Some members fear that wealthy organizations like ACS and AAS may be losing sight of their charters as they pursue revenue As an information specialist with Spring House, Pa.-based chemical manufacturer Rohm and Haas Co., chemist Joann Witiak is a regular user of the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstract Service. She is also a member of the society. So is Steve Weininger, a professor of chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts. Witiak generally pays about $68 per

Julia King
Some members fear that wealthy organizations like ACS and AAS may be losing sight of their charters as they pursue revenue

As an information specialist with Spring House, Pa.-based chemical manufacturer Rohm and Haas Co., chemist Joann Witiak is a regular user of the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstract Service. She is also a member of the society.

So is Steve Weininger, a professor of chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts. Witiak generally pays about $68 per hour to search the service's popular Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) database. Weininger, who as an academic is entitled to work on the system during off-hours at a discount ranging as high as 85 percent, usually pays between $10 and $15 an hour to search the same database.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. Founded: 1884 Headquarters: New York City Membership: 300,000 1991 Membership Dues (for ~U. S. members): $83

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