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Simon Silver

The Scientist has asked a group of experts to comment periodically upon recent articles that they have found noteworthy. Their selections, presented herein every issue, are neither endorsements of content nor the result of systematic searching. Rather, the list represents personal choices of articles the columnists believe the scientific community as a whole may also find interesting. Reprints of any articles cited here may be ordered through The Genuine Article, 3501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104, or by telephoning (215) 386-4399.


Author: SIMON SILVER
Department of Microbiology & Immunology
University of Illinois
Chicago

  • Ubiquitin (an abundant 76-amino-acid polypeptide responsible for protein turnover in eukaryotes) requires covalent attachment to target proteins to guide proteolysis. Two new heat-shock genes for ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) enzymes have been identified, cloned, and sequenced in yeast. The products are needed for protein turnover. Previously identified UBC genes affect diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, sporulation, and G1...

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