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As Challenges Mount for Academic Research, More Scientists Take Administrative Positions

Administrative Positions Date: November 9, 1992 From congressional scrutiny of universities' indirect costs to public concerns over biohazards and the ethics of animal studies, issues surrounding sponsored academic research have been dominating the headlines recently. For universities and research institutions around the United States, that means their job is getting harder, as government agencies, legislators, and even the schools themselves surround the research process with an increasingly

Marcia Clemmitt

Administrative Positions Date: November 9, 1992

From congressional scrutiny of universities' indirect costs to public concerns over biohazards and the ethics of animal studies, issues surrounding sponsored academic research have been dominating the headlines recently. For universities and research institutions around the United States, that means their job is getting harder, as government agencies, legislators, and even the schools themselves surround the research process with an increasingly thorny thicket of regulations designed to ward off trouble before it starts.

To cope with the growing demands of the process, even many smaller universities and colleges are consolidating their research expertise and oversight in central offices, run by administrators whose sole responsibility is overseeing the funding and conduct of research. And though few numbers exist to verify the perception, these research administrators say a growing number of scientists seem to be considering their occupation as a career option.

According to research administrators...

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