Associations' Programs Aid Aspiring Disabled Scientists

CALLING ALL MENTORS: Washington's Steven Nourse says disabled students often are not encouraged by teachers and counselors to study science. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires that United States companies comply with mandates to improve accessibility for disabled individuals. Yet U.S. Census data show that disabled people constitute more than 10 percent of the general work force and only 2.7 percent of the scientific and engineering work force. To improve opportunities for th

Stephen Hoffert
Mar 15, 1998


CALLING ALL MENTORS: Washington's Steven Nourse says disabled students often are not encouraged by teachers and counselors to study science.
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires that United States companies comply with mandates to improve accessibility for disabled individuals. Yet U.S. Census data show that disabled people constitute more than 10 percent of the general work force and only 2.7 percent of the scientific and engineering work force. To improve opportunities for the disabled, professional associations have launched a variety of programs that focus on increasing the number of disabled students in science at the high school and college levels. They are also leading the drive to recruit disabled scientists for jobs in companies and government agencies. Some are even offering internship programs that provide qualified disabled students with access to the top U.S. science and technology companies and agencies. Lacking opportunity and encouragement from educators, many high...