Biological Informatics: The Virtual Cell: Modeling Cellular Processes

Biochemist John Carson uses The Virtual Cell to compare experimental and simulation results. Biologists are generating a vast amount of data on the molecular events that occur in the cell. Since a computer might the best tool for researchers to integrate all the information and sort out the complexities of a typical biological process, the next logical step would be to develop appropriate software for the job. A team at the University of Connecticut (UConn) Health Center in Farmington is attemp

Nadia Halim
May 9, 1999


Biochemist John Carson uses The Virtual Cell to compare experimental and simulation results.
Biologists are generating a vast amount of data on the molecular events that occur in the cell. Since a computer might the best tool for researchers to integrate all the information and sort out the complexities of a typical biological process, the next logical step would be to develop appropriate software for the job. A team at the University of Connecticut (UConn) Health Center in Farmington is attempting to do just that with a program called The Virtual Cell.

The interdisciplinary effort involves biochemists, biologists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and physicists. Their goal is not to create a model in itself, or to create a system to model a whole cell, but to develop a tool for experimental biologists. Thus, the approach requires no user programming; instead, the user specifies biologically relevant abstractions such as reactions, cellular compartments,...

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