Biology/Biotechnology

SIMON SILVER Department of Microbiology & Immunology University of Illinois Chicago The hype is out of proportion, but the 12 October issue of Science spotlights the Human Genome Project with an attractive cover montage, a removable centerfold of current human chromosome maps (intended for wall display), and a status report. Real progress is being made, however, as exemplified by the promising new approaches presented in the same issue. J.C. Stephens, M.L. Cavanaugh, M.I. Gradie, M.L. Mador,

Simon Silver
Dec 9, 1990

SIMON SILVER
Department of Microbiology & Immunology
University of Illinois
Chicago

The hype is out of proportion, but the 12 October issue of Science spotlights the Human Genome Project with an attractive cover montage, a removable centerfold of current human chromosome maps (intended for wall display), and a status report. Real progress is being made, however, as exemplified by the promising new approaches presented in the same issue.

J.C. Stephens, M.L. Cavanaugh, M.I. Gradie, M.L. Mador, K.K. Kidd, "Mapping the human genome: current status," Science, 250, 237-44, 12 October 1990. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Md.; Yale University, New Haven, Conn.) D.R. Cox, M. Burmeister, E.R. Price, S. Kim, R.M. Myers, "Radiation hybrid mapping: a somatic cell genetic method for constructing high-resolution maps of mammalian chromosomes," Science, 250, 245-50, 12 October 1990. (University of California, San Francisco) M. Koob, W. Szybalski, "Cleaving yeast and Escherichia coli genomes at a single site,"...