Bromley Brings His No-Nonsense Style To Science Adviser's Job

WASHINGTON—The view with respect to Yale nuclear physicist D. Allan Bromley seems to be unanimous: The new assistant to the pres- ident for science and technology, in the words of one colleague, “cuts through the crap to get things done.” On April 20, the White House issued an announcement that the science community had been anxiously awaiting for months: President Bush had selected his new science adviser. Long rumored for the position, Bromley comes to the job with true

Jeffrey Mervis
May 14, 1989

WASHINGTON—The view with respect to Yale nuclear physicist D. Allan Bromley seems to be unanimous: The new assistant to the pres- ident for science and technology, in the words of one colleague, “cuts through the crap to get things done.”

On April 20, the White House issued an announcement that the science community had been anxiously awaiting for months: President Bush had selected his new science adviser.

Long rumored for the position, Bromley comes to the job with true-blue Republican credentials: As an eight-year member of the moribund White House Science Council and arecentappointee to the National Science Board, he already holds two presidentially appointed spots. Now, the 63-year-old Bromley will actually be wearing two hats in the Bush administration: assistant to the president and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Each job has its strengths and pitfalls. As presidential assistant, Bromley holds a rank one...

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