Cerami's New Lab Aims For Bountiful Blend Of Basic Research And Product Development

Investigations on aging lead the Long Island institute's efforts to combine the best traits of 'pure' and 'applied' research Just over a year after launch, the Picower Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, N.Y., is gathering momentum, and confidence among institute researchers is growing. The institute came into being Oct. 1, 1991--although it was created on paper July 31--with the near-total transplantation of top researcher Anthony Cerami's group from the Laboratory of Medical Bioc

Franklin Hoke
Feb 21, 1993


Investigations on aging lead the Long Island institute's efforts to combine the best traits of 'pure' and 'applied' research

Just over a year after launch, the Picower Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, N.Y., is gathering momentum, and confidence among institute researchers is growing. The institute came into being Oct. 1, 1991--although it was created on paper July 31--with the near-total transplantation of top researcher Anthony Cerami's group from the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry at Rockefeller University, Manhattan, to quarters in the Boas-Marks Biomedical Research Center at North Shore University Hospital, Long Island.

The goal of the Picower is to "apply the insights gained through basic laboratory and clinical research to the discovery of new approaches to curing and preventing disease and improving human health," according to its mission statement. This aim will best be accomplished, say Cerami and the researchers who have joined him, by channeling the institute's efforts...

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