Chevron Awards Honor Conservationists

Nominations are now being accepted for the Chevron Conservation Awards, the oldest privately sponsored program of its kind in the United States. The $1,000 awards will recognize 10 professionals, 10 citizen volunteers, and five nonprofit organizations working to enhance U.S. air, water, land, and wildlife resources. The awards, to be presented in May, include a bronze plaque and a trip to Washington, D.C., for the presentation. The awards are important because "they attempt to recognize people

Barbara Spector
Oct 28, 1990
Nominations are now being accepted for the Chevron Conservation Awards, the oldest privately sponsored program of its kind in the United States. The $1,000 awards will recognize 10 professionals, 10 citizen volunteers, and five nonprofit organizations working to enhance U.S. air, water, land, and wildlife resources. The awards, to be presented in May, include a bronze plaque and a trip to Washington, D.C., for the presentation.

The awards are important because "they attempt to recognize people [working] on projects that, for one reason or other, are extremely successful on a local or regional basis, but haven't been well known nationally," says Joseph S. Larson, director of the Environmental Institute at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. One of the benefits of the award is that the winners are "given publicity across the nation," says Larson, who won a Chevron Award last year for developing models for assessing fresh-water wetlands.

The San...

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