Clinical Trials Debate Continues: Asian American women want their fair share of clinical trials--but what is fair?

IMPROVEMENT ON THE WAY: NAWHO President Mary Chung says that better education within the Asian American community will incease participation of Asian American women in clinical trials. Asian Americans comprise approximately 4 percent of the U.S. population, and they now account for 4 percent of the women enrolled in U.S. National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trials. This satisfies the spirit of the NIH Guidelines on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Resea

Myrna Watanabe
Nov 8, 1998


IMPROVEMENT ON THE WAY: NAWHO President Mary Chung says that better education within the Asian American community will incease participation of Asian American women in clinical trials.
Asian Americans comprise approximately 4 percent of the U.S. population, and they now account for 4 percent of the women enrolled in U.S. National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trials. This satisfies the spirit of the NIH Guidelines on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research, promulgated in 1994 in response to Congress's NIH Revitalization Act of 1993. The will of Congress was to ensure that women and minorities were included proportionally in NIH-sponsored clinical trials (M. Watanabe, The Scientist, 9[5]:14, March 6, 1995). But health activists in the Asian American communities are not satisfied with the 4 percent representation in clinical trials. And, as pointed out by oncologist Otis Brawley, director of the Office of...

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