'Consensus Statement' Fails To Capture Attention In Washington, D.C.

At the same time, he and other framers of the statement say they are gratified that so many diverse and prestigious organizations have put their support behind the effort. "I guess I had hoped that more congressional offices and more parts of the [Clinton] administration would have taken note of the breadth of the constituents that had thought it important to prepare a statement," says Leon Rosenberg, president of the Bristol-Myers

Barbara Spector
Sep 18, 1994
A "consensus statement" advocating increased United States government funding for biomedical research--endorsed by more than 230 institutions, associations, and companies and distributed widely last May--has generally been accepted in polite silence by lawmakers in Washington, D.C. The chairman of the forum at which the document was drafted says he is disappointed by the lack of attention given it by legislators and the media.

At the same time, he and other framers of the statement say they are gratified that so many diverse and prestigious organizations have put their support behind the effort.

"I guess I had hoped that more congressional offices and more parts of the [Clinton] administration would have taken note of the breadth of the constituents that had thought it important to prepare a statement," says Leon Rosenberg, president of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute in Princeton, N.J. Rosenberg chaired the March 9 meeting sponsored by Research!America,...

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