Emigre Soviet Scientists Remain Jobless In U.S., Despite Experience

New York alliance offers guidance and support to Russian researchers who are seeking employment in their adopted country Alexander Bolonkin, a mathematician specializing in aerodynamics, has a 10-year gap in his r‚sum‚, from 1972 to 1982, because he was serving time in a Soviet prison camp. Bolonkin is now studying English, but he still has quite a bit to learn; he says he came to the United States "1« hours ago" when he means "1« years ago." Since arriving in the U.S.,

Barbara Spector
Sep 16, 1990


New York alliance offers guidance and support to Russian researchers who are seeking employment in their adopted country
  • Alexander Bolonkin, a mathematician specializing in aerodynamics, has a 10-year gap in his r‚sum‚, from 1972 to 1982, because he was serving time in a Soviet prison camp. Bolonkin is now studying English, but he still has quite a bit to learn; he says he came to the United States "1« hours ago" when he means "1« years ago." Since arriving in the U.S., he has managed to find some temporary work at two financial firms, but, because of his poor English, neither of these stints turned into permanent positions.

  • Analytical chemist Marianna Karabach worked in forensics for about 20 years in Moscow before emigrating last year. "On my r‚sum‚ I hide that I am Ph.D.," to avoid appearing overqualified for jobs in the U.S., she says. In fact, she has grown...
  • Interested in reading more?

    Become a Member of

    Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
    Already a member?