Fast Censure for Glueck

WASHINGTON—The recent censure of Charles J. Glueck for misreporting his studies of children on low-cholesterol diets illustrates the biomedical community’s increasing concern about scientific misconduct, according to NIH Deputy Director William Raub. Glueck, who has received several NIH grants, was formally censured by the agency last month. It has recommended that Glueck be barred from receiving any federal funds for two years, and banned from serving on any government advisory g

Charles Marwick
Aug 9, 1987

WASHINGTON—The recent censure of Charles J. Glueck for misreporting his studies of children on low-cholesterol diets illustrates the biomedical community’s increasing concern about scientific misconduct, according to NIH Deputy Director William Raub.

Glueck, who has received several NIH grants, was formally censured by the agency last month. It has recommended that Glueck be barred from receiving any federal funds for two years, and banned from serving on any government advisory group for five years.

The NIH report concludes an unusually speedy disciplinary process that began in July 1986. At that time, the agency asked the University of Cincinnati, where Glueck was a professor of internal medicine, to investigate allegations about a Glueck paper scheduled for publication in Pediatrics.

The paper concluded that a low-cholesterol diet, at times supplemented with drugs, effectively lowered high blood cholesterol levels in children but did not interfere with their growth and development. Scientists familiar with...