Firms Forge Black Links

WASHINGTON-Looking for something new after 23 years at Bell Laboratories, Elliott Slutsky became a visiting professor in electrical engineering at Tennessee State University. This fall, three years later, he began his second year of teaching at Howard University. The work is hard, the hours long, and the problems are many. But he is no longer bored. "We're solving problems," he explained. "Besides teaching, I'm working to improve the curriculum. Industry people really can make a difference, be

Susan Walton
Oct 19, 1986

WASHINGTON-Looking for something new after 23 years at Bell Laboratories, Elliott Slutsky became a visiting professor in electrical engineering at Tennessee State University.

This fall, three years later, he began his second year of teaching at Howard University. The work is hard, the hours long, and the problems are many. But he is no longer bored.

"We're solving problems," he explained. "Besides teaching, I'm working to improve the curriculum. Industry people really can make a difference, because they know what students need."

Slutsky is one of 13 scientists and engineers from the AT&T facility on loan this year to faculty around the country. The program, begun in 1973, is one of a growing number of links that businesses and government have forged to improve training in the sciences and engineering at historically black schools.

Participants in many of these alliances gathered here last month to mark the fifth anniversary of...