Frontlines

Researchers are homing in on genetics as a potential cause of obesity, but to date, few obesity-related genes have been discovered, and those tend to be very rare in the population (See " Genes Do Play a Role in Obesity,"). But a group including scientists from Myriad Genetics and University of Utah, both in Salt Lake City, and Bayer Corp., West Haven, Conn., has identified a locus that is significantly linked to high body mass index (BMI) in obese women; this locus will likely yield a gene that

Hal Cohen
Apr 28, 2002
Researchers are homing in on genetics as a potential cause of obesity, but to date, few obesity-related genes have been discovered, and those tend to be very rare in the population (See " Genes Do Play a Role in Obesity,"). But a group including scientists from Myriad Genetics and University of Utah, both in Salt Lake City, and Bayer Corp., West Haven, Conn., has identified a locus that is significantly linked to high body mass index (BMI) in obese women; this locus will likely yield a gene that is more common than other known obesity genes. (S. Stone et al., "A major predisposition locus for severe obesity at 4p15-p14," American Journal of Human Genetics, 70 online at: www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v70n6/023765/023765.html, April 15, 2002). Many questions remain. The specific gene has not been identified, according to paper coauthor Steven C. Hunt, University of Utah. Nor do the researchers know how it...

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