Glasnost Gives U.S. Teens Peek At Science Journal, Kvant

WASHINGTON—United States scientists are putting the final touches on the first issue of an English-language version of a Soviet magazine for gifted high school science and math students. A striking example of glasnost, the publishing venture is all the more remarkable because of the scientist who first proposed the idea of a joint arrangement between the two countries. The magazine will be called Quantum, a translation of its namesake, Kvant. It will debut in late November under the aus

Jeffrey Mervis
Oct 29, 1989

WASHINGTON—United States scientists are putting the final touches on the first issue of an English-language version of a Soviet magazine for gifted high school science and math students. A striking example of glasnost, the publishing venture is all the more remarkable because of the scientist who first proposed the idea of a joint arrangement between the two countries.

The magazine will be called Quantum, a translation of its namesake, Kvant. It will debut in late November under the auspices of three scientific societies and with the support of a three-year, $366,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Reflecting its initial focus on mathematics and physics, the magazine will be published by the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

“This is a magazine for the nerds and geeks in our high schools,” says Sheldon Glashow, the Harvard physicist...

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