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Honorary Degrees: Controversial For Centuries

Last month, Roald Hoffmann, winner of the 1981 Nobel Prize in chemistry, added two more laurels to his already lengthy curriculum vitae when he accepted honorary degrees from the universities of Central Florida and Arizona. Top United States research institutions giving honorary degrees to scientists this spring include: University of Arizona, Tucson: Roald Hoffmann, John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science, Cornell University, winner of 1981 Nobel Prize in chemistry; Julius B. Richmon

Barbara Spector
Last month, Roald Hoffmann, winner of the 1981 Nobel Prize in chemistry, added two more laurels to his already lengthy curriculum vitae when he accepted honorary degrees from the universities of Central Florida and Arizona.

Top United States research institutions giving honorary degrees to scientists this spring include:

University of Arizona, Tucson: Roald Hoffmann, John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science, Cornell University, winner of 1981 Nobel Prize in chemistry; Julius B. Richmond, John D. MacArthur Professor of Health Policy, Harvard Medical School.

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver: Sidney Altman, Sterling Professor of Biology, Yale University, winner of 1989 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

Columbia University: Walter E. Massey, director, National Science Foundation; Melvin Schwartz, associate director for high-energy and nuclear physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, winner of 1988 Nobel Prize in physics; David B. Sprinson, professor emeritus of biochemistry, Columbia University.

Duke University: Gertrude B. Elion, scientist emeritus, Burroughs...

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