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Independent Institutes Search For New Sources Of Funding

'IN TRANSITION': Association of Independent Research Institutes members are looking at new strategies, says president David Beck. Independent research institutes, which garner 10 percent of the National Institutes of Health's extramural research funding budget, rely heavily on federal support. With increased competition for grants and government funding far from assured, these institutes are reevaluating their financial strategies. Members of the Association of Independent Research Institutes

Myrna Watanabe


'IN TRANSITION': Association of Independent Research Institutes members are looking at new strategies, says president David Beck.
Independent research institutes, which garner 10 percent of the National Institutes of Health's extramural research funding budget, rely heavily on federal support. With increased competition for grants and government funding far from assured, these institutes are reevaluating their financial strategies. Members of the Association of Independent Research Institutes (AIRI) report that they are "in transition," according to AIRI president David Beck. Some are rethinking their foci, while others are fusing with other organizations, seeking research partners, or looking at new sources of revenue. "This is sort of new," says Beck. He explains that although these institutes are not going through "hard times," some are looking for "a way to stabilize" funding.

Independent research institutes vary in size and focus. AIRI consists of approximately 85 diverse members. They can be small organizations like...

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